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Introduction to Subway Ridership

Subway
Introduction
At a Glance
Ridership by Subway Station
The Ten Busiest Subway Stations 2014

Bus
Introduction
At a Glance
Ridership by Bus Route
The Ten Busiest Local Bus Routes 2014

 


Introduction to Subway Ridership

Subway ridership consists of all passengers (other than NYC Transit employees) who enter the subway system, including passengers who transfer from buses.  Ridership does not include passengers who exit the subway or passengers who transfer from other subway lines, with the exception of out-of-system transfers; e.g., between the Lexington Av/63 St F subwaystation and the Lexington Avenue N subwayQ subwayR subway/59 St4 subway5 subway6 subwaystation, where customers use their MetroCard to make the transfer.

Average weekday, Saturday, and Sunday ridership includes every weekday, Saturday, and Sunday in the year, except major holidays and days when the subway system was closed or operated fare-free (Saturday, August 27 and Sunday, August 28, 2011 due to Hurricane Irene, and Monday, October 29 through Friday, November 2, 2012 due to Superstorm Sandy). Average weekend ridership is the two-day sum of average Saturday plus average Sunday ridership. Ridership on major holidays (New Year’s Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas) is included only in the annual total.

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Subway Ridership at a Glance

Year Average Weekday Average Saturday Average Sunday Average Weekend Annual Total
           
2009
5,086,833
2,928,247
2,283,601
5,211,848
1,579,866,600
2010
5,156,913
3,031,289
2,335,077
5,366,366
1,604,198,017
2011
5,284,295
3,082,463
2,414,587
5,497,050
1,640,434,672
2012
5,380,184
3,172,627
2,490,736
5,663,363
1,654,582,265
2013
5,465,034
3,243,495
2,563,022
5,806,517
1,707,555,714
2014
5,597,551
3,233,114
2,662,791
5,985,905
1,751,287,621

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Ridership by Subway Station

The New York City subway system has 468 stations – the largest number of public transit subway stations of any system in the world.  However, the table of ridership by station linked below lists 421 stations, with stations connected by transfer passageways combined into station complexes, since ridership cannot be accurately allocated to each station in the complex.  For example, the 14 St A subwayC subwayE subway station is combined with the 8 Av L subway station. The station names and lines stopping at each station reflect service at the end of 2014.

In the following tables, stations are listed alphabetically by borough, and the rankings are by 2014 ridership.  The rankings end at 420 rather than 421 stations, since the Cortlandt St 1 subway, station was closed for the entire year.  The “systemwide adjustment” accounts for miscellaneous ridership and other adjustments that are not allocated by station.

Please click below for the complete tables of subway station ridership.  In these tables, stations that were temporarily closed (either fully or partially) are highlighted in blue; click on the station name for the closure dates.  For these stations, zero ridership was included in the averages for any days when the station was closed, except for the days when the entire subway was closed or fare-free.

Average Weekday Ridership
Average Weekend (Saturday + Sunday) Ridership
Annual Ridership

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Introduction to Bus Ridership

Bus ridership includes all passengers who board buses using a valid MetroCard, cash, transfer, Select Bus Service ticket, or pass.  Ridership does not include employees, non-revenue passengers (e.g., children under 44” tall traveling with an adult), and B42 riders boarding inside the paid zone of the Rockaway Parkway L subway subway station.  A methodology change was implemented in 2010 to exclude certain non-revenue passengers from ridership.  2009 ridership in the “at a glance” and Ridership by Route tables below is adjusted to be consistent with the 2010 methodology.

Average weekday, Saturday, and Sunday ridership includes every weekday, Saturday, and Sunday in the year, except major holidays and days when the bus system was closed or operated fare-free (Saturday, August 27 and Sunday, August 28, 2011 due to Hurricane Irene, and Monday, October 29 through Friday, November 2, 2012 due to Superstorm Sandy).  Average weekend ridership is the two-day sum of average Saturday plus average Sunday ridership.  Ridership on major holidays (New Year’s Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas) is included only in the annual total.

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MTA New York City Transit Bus Ridership at a Glance

Year Average Weekday Average Saturday Average Sunday Average Weekend Annual Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

2009
2,287,098
1,407,332
1,067,398
2,474,730
716,824,107
2010
2,229,257
1,376,735
1,025,084
2,401,819
696,923,393
2011

2,151,877
1,306,386
999,837
2,306,223
670,698,694
2012

2,169,311
1,309,666
998,863
2,308,529
667,910,621
2013

2,166,376

1,314,515

1,007,340

2,321,854

677,569,432

2014
2,123,092
1,305,437
1,024,279
2,329,716
667,051,170

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MTA Bus Company Ridership at a Glance

Year Average Weekday Average Saturday Average Sunday Average Weekend Annual Total
           

2009

392,488
208,059
152,627
360,686
119,521,109
2010
394,509
213,770
153,969
367,739
120,226,874
2011
392,368
210,708
154,774
365,482
119,381,038
2012
400,786
218,658
161,873
380,531
120,877,799
2013
407,217
224,199
168,092
392,291
124,951,185
2014
407,115
228,304
175,552
403,826
125,581,237

 

Ridership by Bus Route

At the end of 2014, the MTA Bus and New York City Transit bus system had 238 local, 7 Select Bus Service and 62 express routes. Local routes begin with one or two letters corresponding to the major borough of operation (B=Brooklyn, Bx=Bronx, M=Manhattan, Q=Queens, S=Staten Island) and express routes begin with the letter “X.”  In the ridership averages, zero was included for any day during the year on which a given route did not operate, except for the days when the entire bus system was closed or fare-free. In the following tables, certain routes that effectively operate as a single route are combined.  For example:

  • The S48 and S98 both run along Forest Avenue in Staten Island. The S48 makes all local stops, and the S98 makes limited stops.
  • The X12 and X42 both run between Mariners Harbor in Staten Island and midtown Manhattan; the X12 travels via lower Manhattan, and the X42 bypasses lower Manhattan.
  • The Bx40 and Bx42 both run along Tremont Avenue in the Bronx; the Bx40 eastern terminal is at Fort Schuyler, and the Bx42 eastern terminal is on Harding Avenue.
The “systemwide adjustment” accounts for miscellaneous ridership not allocated by route and should be added to the route totals to match the official systemwide ridership shown in the “at a glance” table above.

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