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New Exhibits

BRINGING BACK THE CITY: MASS TRANSIT RESPONDS TO CRISIS

Opens September 30, 2015

Bringing Back the City

A new exhibit offering a unique perspective on the vital, often unseen, work of New York's transit employees. Using the events of 9/11, the 2003 Northeast Blackout, Hurricane Sandy and other severe weather events as examples, the exhibition reveals the critical role that mass transit personnel play in preparing for and responding to natural and man-made disasters.  Through a vibrant display of objects, photographs, media, and personal accounts, the exhibition highlights the technical and professional skills needed to restore public transportation service and get New Yorkers moving again after crisis strikes.  

Explore parts of the exhibit online at bringingbackthecity.com

TRANSIT ETIQUETTE OR: HOW I LEARNED TO STOP SPITTING AND STEP ASIDE IN 25 LANGUAGES

March 15 – July 2016
New York Transit Museum Gallery Annex and Store, Grand Central Terminal

Photo of man reading transit etiquette news paper

Whether in Toronto, New York, or Tokyo, inappropriate passenger behaviors are ubiquitous on mass transit and have annoyed commuters for more than a century. Employing creative and engaging visuals and a broad scope of humor, transit agencies around the world, including our own MTA (and its predecessors) have tried to cajole and scold passengers into better behavior. Whether asking people not to smoke, to be safe at the edge of the platform, or to throw away their trash, the graphic posters and videos featured in this exhibit highlight a universal language of courtesy that we can all (hopefully) understand.

FIVE CENTS TO DREAMLAND: A TRIP TO CONEY ISLAND

June 14 - November 2016,
Downtown Brooklyn

Photo of Coney Island Exhibit

From horse-drawn carriages, steamboats, and railroads, to the buses and subways of today, transportation has played a pivotal role in Coney Island’s development as a seaside resort, the home of the world’s first amusement parks and the densely populated neighborhood it became. Coney Island’s attraction as a destination is often attributed to its being easily reached from anywhere in the city and yet exotic enough to feel like a getaway. Over time more options in public transportation allowed a greater spectrum of people to visit Coney Island: in the 1820s only people who owned their own horse and carriage could take the trip; by the dawn of the 20th century most New Yorkers could afford the nickel subway fare.  Through objects, maps and images from the Museum’s collection, Five Cents to Dreamland traces the evolution of public transportation in Brooklyn and its storied connections to the wonders of Coney Island both past and present.

THE SECRET LIFE OF 370 JAY STREET

Downtown Brooklyn, October 28, 2015 - May, 2016

THE SECRET LIFE OF 370 JAY STREET
Less than four blocks from the Transit Museum, above the Jay Street – MetroTech Station, stands a 13-story white limestone building that for more than 50 years housed the headquarters of New York’s evolving transit agencies; first the Board of Transportation, then the Transit Authority, and finally New York City Transit. Behind its 420 perfectly uniform windows, a myriad of transit tasks took place at 370 Jay Street from a Lost and Found Department full of abandoned umbrellas to the secret money processing rooms. This exhibition examines the quirky history of the building as well as its new life as the future home for New York University’s engineering and applied sciences programs.

UNDERGROUND: JOAN IACONETTI WATERCOLORS

May 10 – September 2016

Downtown Brooklyn

picture of stairs to underground station
In her series of evocative, geometric-impressionist watercolors, artist Joan Iaconetti simplifies the complex interaction of humans and subway station architecture into ragged shapes of light and dark. The paintings, created in layers of thick transparent watercolor and gouache, are illuminated by the fractured light of speeding trains as they pass by.
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