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MTA Bridges and Tunnels Construction Improvements

Henry Hudson Bridge

A three-year, $33 million project is underway to replace the original 1930s steel curb stringers that support the upper level roadway on either side of the bridge. In addition to replacing the stringers and installing 3,600-feet of new bridge decking, new energy-efficient roadway lighting will also be added. The new space will be re-striped, resulting in wider traffic lanes across the bridge.

Henry Hudson Bridge Stringer Replacement

 

New Grid DeckInstalled grid deck panels
New Grid DeckInstallation of grid deck panels on new steel beams
New Grid DeckCompleted grid deck roadway with concrete barrier rebar.
   
New Grid DeckConcrete being poured into new grid deck
New Grid DeckAfter concrete is poured it is covered with wet burlap to help it set properly
imgold
imgnew
old girder being lifted out (left) and replaced by new one (right).
Northbound upper level roadway, view toward Bronx, Henry Hudson BridgeNorthbound upper level roadway, view toward Bronx, Henry Hudson Bridge
   
Workers replacing the bridge's original curb stringer boxes, commonly used in the  1930s when the bridge was built, with new sub-structure steel beams, shown here being hoisted. All together there will be 30 of these steel girders installed. Each steel beam weighs 3,000 lbs.
Protective shield  installation for upper level work.Protective shield installation for upper level work.
   
Old stringer curb box that is being removedOld stringer curb box that is being removed
Example of corroded stringer  box that is being removed. This is what happens when water seeps into the empty  stringer box.Example of corroded stringer box that is being removed. This is what happens when water seeps into the empty stringer box.
New steel grid put in  place after old stringer box was removed.New steel grid put in place after old stringer box was removed.

Bronx-Whitestone Bridge

A 42-month, $109 million reconstruction of the Queens approach to the bridge is underway. The contract was awarded jointly to E.E. Cruz, of Manhattan, and Tully Construction Co., of Queens in July 2011. The work includes reconstruction and widening of the 1,010-foot-long Queens approach roadway and the addition of new safety shoulders. The children's playground beneath the bridge in Francis Lewis Park has already been moved from beneath the bridge and completely renovated, thanks to B&T. It reopened in May  2012.

New Piers Taking Shape

Photos by MTA Bridges and Tunnels Jeffrey Brugge

New Piers Taking Shape New Piers Taking Shape
New steel girders put in place New east side retaining wall
   
New Piers Taking Shape
Augering in 9" and 12" mini piles to provide substructure support
   
New Piers Taking Shape New Piers Taking Shape
Custom steel formwork is erected to give the new pier it's double arch shape Formwork in place showing the double arch design
   
New Piers Taking Shape New Piers Taking Shape
Thousands of pounds of reinforcing bar is set in pier. All rebar is checked for proper spacing, size and clearance The final face of the custom formwork is bolted together and hundreds of yards of concrete is pumped in to create the pier
   
New Piers Taking Shape New Piers Taking Shape
Pier fully formed and ready for concrete Formwork is removed, revealing the new wider bridge support structure

New Playground

Photos by MTA Bridges and Tunnels Jeffrey Brugge

New Piers Taking Shape New Piers Taking Shape
Francis Lewis Old Playground: Old Francis Lewis children's playground beneath bridge New swings install: Swings taking shape at new Francis Lewis Park children's playground
   
New Piers Taking Shape New Piers Taking Shape
New swings: Completed swing set at new playground Playground: Children's discovery center
   
New Piers Taking Shape New Piers Taking Shape
Foreground new sprinkler fountain; in rear is toddler climbing wall Wide view of new playground equipment

Throgs Neck Bridge

The Queens approach of the 53-year-old bridge is being replaced under this $96.7 million contract. Main features of project include replacement of the entire concrete roadway deck, which was nearing the end of its useful life, at the Queens side of the span; rehabilitation of abutment and concrete retaining walls; and painting of structural steel including the Cross Island Parkway on- and off-ramps.  More than 140,000 square feet of the roadway deck on 11 spans of the bridge in Queens are being replaced.  Active construction will continue through mid-2010, with full project completion in 2011.

Northbound roadway in Queens under construction Paint removal containment operation.

Northbound roadway in Queens under construction

Paint removal containment operation.
   
New roadway taking shape  
New roadway taking shape  

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project

This is a $50 million, 45-month Capital improvement project that is expected to be completed in 2015. Highlights of the work include:

  • A new fly-over ramp from Narrows Road South (service road) to help ease car and bus traffic onto the Brooklyn-bound upper level of the bridge.
  • A new fly-over ramp at the Lily Pond entrance ramp to the bridge will be constructed to improve roadway logistics and allow smoother access for buses and cars onto the bridge's upper level.
  • Construction of a new lower level connector ramp that will take motorists directly from the Staten Island Expressway to the bridge's lower level.
  • Rehabilitation of the Father Capodanno entrance ramp and the Lily Pond exit ramp.
  • Rehabilitation of the toll plaza roadway from the Staten Island Expressway to accommodate traffic that will be traveling through the area at highway speeds rather than toll booth stop and go conditions.

Photos by Metropolitan Transportation Authority - STV Resident Engineer Bob Kuehlewein.

 

Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project
The newly completed eastbound Lily Pond Avenue Bridge. New precast panels are installed for the new eastbound Lily Pond Ramp, which will tie into the newly completed Lily Pond Bridge which is seen in the background.
Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project
New Narrows Road South Bridge, looking east. Verrazano-Narrows Bridge is in the background. New Narrows Road South ramp, looking west. Contractor is placing concrete barriers.
   
Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project
Eastbound Lower Level Connector with sub-base material in place. This new ramp passes below the newly completed Narrows Road South Bridge. Eastbound Lower Level Connector (eastbound SIE traffic to the left) with completed placement of concrete pavement and new wall on the right.
   
Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project

At the east end of the existing Narrows Road South on-ramp, the contractor installs additional concrete barrier to further extend the work zone so additional Stage 2 drainage can be installed.

 The auger machine excavates the hole for the tangent pile installation for the Narrows Road South Ramp (This is looking west towards Fingerboard Road Bridge along the EB Service Road).

Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project

Pile installation along the Narrows Road South, just east of Fingerboard Road (EB Service Road).

Toll Plaza area by the Upper Level/Lower Level roadway split EB, the contractor is installing drainage structures. 

   
Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project

This is the demolition of the existing Narrows Road South overpass showing an excavator machine with a claw attachment grabs the far end of the steel girder while the second excavator helps guide the steel to the ground.  Half of the structure is being demolished in order to maintain one lane of traffic to the bridge.  The other half of the structure will be demolished after the construction of the new Narrows Road South Ramp is complete.

Setting precast wall panels for the new Narrows Road South on-ramp bridge.

   
Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project

Looking west the construction of the Precast panel walls for the new Narrows Road South on-ramp.

Adjacent to the SIE eastbound, the installation of the precast panel wall  of the new Narrows Road South on-ramp.

   
Verrazano Toll Plaza Improvement Project
 

Looking east toward the bridge, the new east abutment for the new Narrows RoadSouth on  ramp is being constructed

   
   

Toll Booth Removal Project

On the night of Feb. 1-2, 2012, the last remaining long-decommissioned eastbound toll booths at the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge were torn down. The work is part of a $50 million Capital project to improve traffic flow through the toll plaza.
Other highlights of the project, which is expected to be completed by 2015 include:

  • A new fly-over ramp from Narrows Road South (service road) will be built to help ease both car and bus traffic onto the Brooklyn-bound upper level of the bridge.
  • Rehabilitation of the toll plaza roadway from the Staten Island Expressway to accommodate traffic that will be traveling through the area at highway speeds rather than toll booth stop and go conditions.
  • Construction of a new lower level connector ramp that will take motorists directly from the Staten Island Expressway to the bridge's lower level.
  • A new fly-over ramp at the Lily Pond entrance ramp to the bridge will be constructed to improve roadway logistics and allow smoother access for buses and cars onto the bridge's upper level.
  • Rehabilitation of the Father Capodanno entrance ramp and the Lily Pond exit ramp.

 

Photos by Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Patrick Cashin.

VN Toll Booth Removal Project VN Toll Booth Removal Project

 

   
VN Toll Booth Removal Project VN Toll Booth Removal Project

 

   
VN Toll Booth Removal Project VN Toll Booth Removal Project

 

   
VN Toll Booth Removal Project

VN Toll Booth Removal Project VN Toll Booth Removal Project

 

   

Paint Removal Project

Containment system wrapping the lower tower legs of the bridge is part of a two-year, nearly $19 million Capital construction project to remove old lead paint, repair and rehabilitate steel and  repaint the interior and exterior of the tower legs on both the Staten Island and Brooklyn sides of the bridge. The shroud-like covering is put in place to make sure the old paint does not escape into the environment. It is then collected and disposed of in strict accordance with New York State regulations.

Bridges need to be painted in order to keep them in a state of good repair and to provide protective coating against corrosion. The Verrazano-Narrows is particularly susceptible to corrosion because of the wind patterns where it sits in New York Bay and its exposure to harsh sea and salt air.  An estimated 11,500 gallons of high-performance paint, specially designed for bridges, will be used for this project.

VN Legs paint 4 VN Tower Legs 2

VN legs paint 4: Cable and pulley system is constructed on the Staten Island tower legs in preparation for the tarps that will completely enclose the steel structure before abrasive blasting of old paint begins.

VN Tower Legs 2:  Side view of Staten Island tower leg completely wrapped in the containment system. Work began in late 2010 with actual removal of paint beginning in July 2011.

   
VN SI Tower Legs

VN SI Tower Legs:  View of the Staten Island tower legs under containment system taken from the Brooklyn side of the bridge. Once completed, work will move to the Brooklyn side of the bridge.

RFK Bridge Planned Rehabilitation Projects

Project Overview

Through 2019 motorists can expect to see plenty of activity at the sprawling, three-complex Robert F. Kennedy Bridge as MTA Bridges and Tunnels is spending nearly $1 billion in Capital improvements. The largest  projects  include reconstructing the supporting bridge structures at the Manhattan and Bronx toll plazas and rehabilitating and replacing the bridge’s seven ramps.

The RFK Bridge, which opened in July 1939,  includes three bridges and 14 miles of roadways that merge at a junction structure on Randall's Island where traffic is distributed to and from Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx.

Click the following tabs to see work unfolding.

 

Manhattan toll plaza resurfacing

Some 400,000-square-feet of old asphalt at the Manhattan toll plaza was removed and replaced with a new, rubberized asphalt to help prevent water from seeping into the concrete deck. This $5.8 million project, completed in early 2012, provides a smoother riding surface for customers and will extend the life of the roadway until full reconstruction of the Manhattan toll plaza gets underway.

Before: RFK Manhattan Toll Plaza Resurfacing After: RFK Manhattan Toll Plaza Resurfacing
Before: Harlem River Lift Span Manhattan Plaza After: Harlem River Lift Span Manhattan Plaza
During: RFK Manhattan Toll Plaza Resurfacing After: RFK Manhattan Toll Plaza Resurfacing
During: RFK Manhattan Toll Plaza Resurfacing After: Manhattan Plaza Striped


Harlem River Drive Exit Ramp

The 12,000-square-foot Harlem River Drive southbound exit ramp, which leads onto the bridge at East 125th Street, was completely rebuilt. A temporary ramp was put in place while the 50-year-old ramp was reconstructed. The $12.4 million project was completed in December 2011.

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